Taxonomy: Bacteria; Firmicutes; Bacilli; Bacillales; Staphylococcaceae;

Staphylococcus

Staphylococcus search

Read about Staphylococcus:

Hide info

Staphylococcus aureus

I. Organism Information

A. Taxonomy Information

1. Species

a. Staphylococcus aureus

i. Taxonomy ID: 1280

ii. Description:

Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases, and is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics (1). These resistant bacteria are called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. S. aureus is responsible for a variety of ailments, including carbuncles, food poisoning, wound and medical device-related infections, bacteremia, necrotizing pneumonia, and endocarditis (2). S. aureus forms a fairly large yellow colony on rich medium and is hemolytic on blood agar. Staphylococci are facultative anaerobes that ferment glucose to lactate. The bacteria are catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. S. aureus can grow at a temperature range of 15 to 45 degrees and at NaCl concentrations as high as 15 percent. Almost all strains of S. aureus produce the enzyme coagulase. S. aureus should always be considered a potential pathogen (3).

To contribute more information, please contact help@nmpdr.org

iii. Variants

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus
Taxonomy ID: 46170

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus COL
Taxonomy ID: 93062
Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MRSA252
Taxonomy ID: 282458
Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MSSA476
Taxonomy ID: 282459
Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MW2
Taxonomy ID: 196620

Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Mu50
Taxonomy ID: 158878
Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315
Taxonomy ID: 158879
Parent: Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

B. Lifecycle and Morphology

1. (To contribute to this description of the infection cycle, please contact help@nmpdr.org)

a. Shape:

Cocci 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. Cells occur singly or in pairs. Division is in two planes, giving rise to clusters. Colonies are smooth, raised, glistening, circular, entire and translucent. Single colonies may obtain a size of 6-8 mm in diameter (4).

b. Picture:

SEM of Staphylococcus aureus
SEM of numerous clumps of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, commonly referred to by the acronym, MRSA (magnified 9560x), by Janice Carr, CDC

C. Genome Summary

1. Genome of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus COL

a. Chromosome

i. Genbank Accession Number: NC_002951
ii. Size: 2,809,422 bp
iii. S. aureus COL is an early methicillin-resistant isolate (5).

b. Plasmid pT181

i. Genbank Accession Number: NC_006629
ii. Size: 4,440 bp



II. References

1.  Sanger Institute

2.  Holden MT, Feil EJ, Lindsay JA, Peacock SJ, Day NP, Enright MC, Foster TJ, Moore CE, Hurst L, Atkin R, Barron A, Bason N, Bentley SD, Chillingworth C, Chillingworth T, Churcher C, Clark L, Corton C, Cronin A, Doggett J, Dowd L, Feltwell T, Hance Z, Harris B, Hauser H, Holroyd S, Jagels K, James KD, Lennard N, Line A, Mayes R, Moule S, Mungall K, Ormond D, Quail MA, Rabbinowitsch E, Rutherford K, Sanders M, Sharp S, Simmonds M, Stevens K, Whitehead S, Barrell BG, Spratt BG, Parkhill J. (2004) Complete genomes of two clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains: evidence for the rapid evolution of virulence and drug resistance. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 101: 9786-91.

3.   http://textbookofbacteriology.net/staph.html


4.   Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th edition. John G. Holt, Noel R. Krieg, Peter H.A. Sneath, James T. Staley, and Stanley T. Williams, editors. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1994, pp. 518.

5.   Gill SR, Fouts DE, Archer GL, Mongodin EF, Deboy RT, Ravel J, Paulsen IT, Kolonay JF, Brinkac L, Beanan M, Dodson RJ, Daugherty SC, Madupu R, Angiuoli SV, Durkin AS, Haft DH, Vamathevan J, Khouri H, Utterback T, Lee C, Dimitrov G, Jiang L, Qin H, Weidman J, Tran K, Kang K, Hance IR, Nelson KE, and Fraser CM. (2005) Insights on evolution of virulence and resistance from the complete genome analysis of an early methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and a biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. J. Bacteriol. 187: 2426-2438.

Hide info

Hide info

Staphylococcus - Google News

©2014 Google

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections - HealthCanal.com


Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections
HealthCanal.com
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery lays the groundwork for a new class of antibiotics to fight multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria that cause serious infections. Memphis, Tennessee -St. Jude Children's Research ...

and more »

Abstract and Introduction - Medscape


Abstract and Introduction
Medscape
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as an important pathogen in the community within the last 10 15 years so-called community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Outbreaks have been described among children in daycares, ...

and more »

Prevalence, distribution, and diversity of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus ... - Barfblog (blog)


Barfblog (blog)

Prevalence, distribution, and diversity of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus ...
Barfblog (blog)
Fruit samples and environmental samples in orchards and plants were taken for isolation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella. All isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of virulence genes.

Just how many bugs are on that elevator button? - Laboratory Products News


Just how many bugs are on that elevator button?
Laboratory Products News
Bacteria cultured from the elevator buttons and toilet surfaces included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, coliform (or bowel) bacteria, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas, though they are unlikely to cause specific diseases in most cases. We were surprised by ...

FAK! Master Regulator Of Toxin Production In Staph Infections Discovered - Science 2.0


FAK! Master Regulator Of Toxin Production In Staph Infections Discovered
Science 2.0
Researchers have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The enzym is fatty acid kinase (FAK) and FAK is formed by the proteins FakA and FakB1 or FakB2.

Pennsville Town Hall closed for disinfection after employee found with MRSA - Today's Sunbeam - NJ.com


Pennsville Town Hall closed for disinfection after employee found with MRSA
Today's Sunbeam - NJ.com
PENNSVILLE TWP. Town hall is closed until Monday because of the need for decontamination work after an employee was found infected with MRSA, according to the mayor. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus known as MRSA is an ...

and more »

Researchers Pinpoint Most Common Causes of Dangerous Eye Infection Post ... - Infection Control Today


Researchers Pinpoint Most Common Causes of Dangerous Eye Infection Post ...
Infection Control Today
The most common cause of endophthalmitis, a potentially blinding condition that can occur after eye trauma, eye surgery, and eye injections, are the well-known Staphylococci and Streptococci bacterial strains, according to a study published in the ...

and more »

Back 2 School: Health Checklist - KPRC Houston


Back 2 School: Health Checklist
KPRC Houston
TOWELS CAN SPREAD DANGEROUS SKIN INFECTIONS SUCH AS WHAT WE'VE HEARD IN THE NEWS LATELY, WHAT WE CALL METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREA INFECTIONS. Reporter: TALK TO THE SCHOOL NURSE ABOUT ...

Cluster of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus cases in Queen ... - 7thSpace Interactive (press release)


Cluster of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus cases in Queen ...
7thSpace Interactive (press release)
Three babies (one male and two female, aged 11 to 27 days) in a neonatal ward of QEH were identified to have Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) colonisation through routine surveillance screening since August 10. All of them are under ...

Have a Great Day, Honey, and Don't Get Ebola - Slate Magazine


Slate Magazine

Have a Great Day, Honey, and Don't Get Ebola
Slate Magazine
Because the original quote was about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. F kenheuer and his colleagues are not complaining about inadequate Ebola controls, they are criticizing hospitals for imposing too much isolation on patients with ...

and more »

Hide info

Staphylococcus genome sequence annotation status: click numbers to browse lists of genes or subsystems

Strain annotated in NMPDR Phenotype Genome size, bp Protein Encoding Genes (PEGs) Sort Named genes in subsystems Named genes not in subsystems Hypothetical genes in subsystems Hypothetical genes not in subsystems Subsystems RNAs
Staphylococcus aureus RF122 Bovine mastitis 2,742,531 2,523 1213(45.4%) 731(27.4%) 113(4.2%) 615(23.0%) 316 110
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus COL methicillin resistant, hospital acquired (MRSA) 2,813,862 2,622 1247(44.8%) 718(25.8%) 98(3.5%) 722(25.9%) 330 108
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH1 vancomycin susceptible, hospital acquired (MRSA) 2,879,577 2,685 1194(43.4%) 779(28.3%) 110(4.0%) 666(24.2%) 314 172
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus JH9 vancomycin nonsusceptible, isogenic to JH1, hospital acquired (MRSA, VISA) 2,862,918 2,675 1202(43.9%) 773(28.2%) 108(3.9%) 657(24.0%) 316 165
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MRSA252 methicillin resistant, hospital acquired (MRSA) 2,902,619 2,663 1254(45.7%) 756(27.5%) 77(2.8%) 659(24.0%) 338 110
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MSSA476 methicillin susceptible, community acquired 2,820,454 2,609 1231(45.1%) 763(28.0%) 82(3.0%) 652(23.9%) 335 157
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus MW2 methicillin resistant, community acquired (CA-MRSA) 2,820,462 2,644 1202(43.7%) 790(28.7%) 92(3.3%) 669(24.3%) 337 53
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Mu3   2,880,168 2,495 1094(43.7%) 768(30.7%) 90(3.6%) 549(22.0%) 296 108
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Mu50 methicillin and vancomycin resistant, hospital acquired (MRSA, VRSA) 2,903,147 2,771 1293(44.0%) 818(27.9%) 142(4.8%) 683(23.3%) 337 108
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315 methicillin resistant, hospital acquired (MRSA) 2,839,469 2,648 1279(45.3%) 814(28.9%) 90(3.2%) 638(22.6%) 340 110
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus NCTC 8325 lab strain 2,821,361 2,895 1222(39.9%) 832(27.1%) 110(3.6%) 901(29.4%) 320 109
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus USA300 methicillin resistant, community acquired (CA-MRSA) 2,917,469 2,607 1223(44.1%) 833(30.1%) 86(3.1%) 629(22.7%) 316 105
Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus str. Newman   2,878,897 2,523 1077(42.6%) 782(30.9%) 71(2.8%) 599(23.7%) 293 109
Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228   2,564,615 2,472 1147(44.7%) 723(28.2%) 47(1.8%) 647(25.2%) 325 118
Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A   2,643,840 2,529 1122(42.7%) 678(25.8%) 45(1.7%) 780(29.7%) 316 120
Staphylococcus haemolyticus JCSC1435   2,697,861 2,694 1164(41.8%) 773(27.7%) 53(1.9%) 796(28.6%) 323 111
Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305   2,577,899 2,517 1140(43.7%) 765(29.3%) 42(1.6%) 662(25.4%) 327 122
Topic revision: r6 - 23 Aug 2008 - 11:08:12 - Bruce Parrello
 
Notice to NMPDR Users - The NMPDR BRC contract has ended and bacterial data from NMPDR has been transferred to PATRIC (http://www.patricbrc.org), a new consolidated BRC for all NIAID category A-C priority pathogenic bacteria. NMPDR was a collaboration among researchers from the Computation Institute of the University of Chicago, the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG), Argonne National Laboratory, and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois. NMPDR is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract HHSN266200400042C. Banner images are copyright © Dennis Kunkel.